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" and paul krugman, author wrote train to talk about problems facing the u.s. economy for about an hour 45 next on booktv. [applause] >> well, thank thank you very m. thanks to the passionate attitude and technology in shakespeare books for hosting the event this evening. i also am very excited. i think we are all very excited to see probably two people who i would say are unquestionably the most cited economists in the world today. [applause] in addition to being most cited, and as you all know, those are noble laureates, i would have to say from the vantage point of the institute of economic thinking that if i were to nominate two people as being the most courageous economists in the world and the most impactful, the subpoena to find a list. so we're very excited to be part of this conversation. [applause] as you know, each of them has written a book that pertains to our current challenges and circumstance. joe stiglitz spoke, "the price of inequality" and paul krugman's book, "end this depression now!" are part of your goodie bag tonight. therefore on behalf of them i will thank you for
've spent a good deal of your career working on, mr. hall, has been the improvement of the american economy. and tonight i'd like to join a couple of my colleagues on the democratic side to talk about the economy and specifically to talk about jobs and the things that we can do here in the a winning days of this congress -- wanning days of this congress to create some job opportunities. we've got some very heavy lifting here in congress in the next month and a half. everybody wants to talk about the fiscal cliff, some talk about austerity, bomb, others talk about what needs to be done to lift the debt limit. and all of these issues are before us. tax increases are not. but underlying all of that, foundational to all of that, is putting america back to work. getting americans back into their jobs. if we do that we will clearly increase employment and when you increase employment you always increase tax revenue to the federal government, to state governments and local governments. so our principle task as i see it and i think i'm joined by many of my colleagues, both democratic and republican
and extend the maturity of existing loans. mark carney prepares to take up the reigns of the uk economy any. unlikely to be any good news. third quarter gd figures expected to be revised down. and it's point, click, buy. americans were doing plenty of that yesterdays as early reports suggest online holiday sales soared on cyber monday. and all bets are off. prediction market entrade says it can no longer accept u.s. customers as market regulators say its trades aren't legal. shanghai composite closed below 2,000 for the first time in three years. it comes at a time when plenty have been talking up chinese growth prospects for next year. so we'll get into that more later. but 1991 is the closing level. this the main one to watch across asia. the nikkei did manage to continue it rally adding about 0.4% as the yen weakens on comments this morning. forex, the dollar-yen one to watch, 82.19 is the level there. the aussie dollar doing a little bit abouter despite that weak number on the shanghai composite. sterling is flat. we'll get into that more later. and euro-dollar just barely higher today,
, investors in the financial markets and the real economy, you need sustainability and credibility. the problem with the european union for the time being is that decisionmaking is not sustainable. the united states has a common economic area with a common currency. one central bank, one parliament, and one government. the european union has an economic area with one currency, one central bank, and 17 governments in the eurozone. how the fine trust when you have every day after the decision making, another government -- how you can find an investor going to greece, today you invest in euros. tomorrow, the currency of greece, nobody knows. what kind of investment will go to greece. the biggest problem is not to fill the gap in the public coffers of greece. my eyes, it is a credit crunch in some of the countries. i met the chairman of the greek chamber of commerce when i was there and he'd tell me we have about 300 small and middle sized companies. ferry transport is a very important element of the greek economy. in the health-care system, whatever. most of the jobs are created in sm
going to make the economy worse. they just keep pumping more debt in the the economy. host: you are saying go over the fiscal cliff? caller: yes. it is not even enough in my opinion to balance the budget. it is still about three times the average deficit under bush. let us go back to the clinton tax era. eileen anywhere between republican and libertarian. up -- yes i am not. i lean anywhere between republican and a libertarian. host: what do you make of republicans up on capitol hill -- to sort of a back off the tax pledge that he took when he ran for senate, saying he would not raise taxes. caller: if we are going to raise taxes my important thing is raising them on everybody. because if they try to strike a compromise where only the rich get taxed, then it gets more progressive. it is not a point to help the budget. we are right to raise taxes, raise them all the way down to where clinton had them. host: senators lindsey gramm represented peter king, talking publicly abandoning the pledge of democrats will talk seriously about entitlement reforms. rest in peace, grover norquis
by 20% stuff like that. the old problem was not enough spending in the economy. one player that should have been spending more was the government thinks to adolf felt hitler they did but they should have been doing to increase spending. there is overwhelming confirmation and this is a time to have the government spend more would pit -- but people to work and put capital to work it is hard politically because it is hard to persuade people which is why some of us write books. [laughter] >> host: someone argue with you to say you do the spending big issue of boost then you fall back. but we did not to. what happened? >> that is interesting story. a lot of people just like montgomery ward was a major store chain. but the major -- but he believed they would come back so he hoarded cash waiting for the depression to come back by the time it was clear they lost their position in the marketplace. is not steadied as much as it should have been but that story of what is going on is about excessive practice with the debt bubble and it burst leaving people stranded with too much debt. what happene
't heard before. could christmas actually be bad for the economy? d? on black friday, it doesn't matter, as long as we end up here at 5 a.m., or at homedepot.com, starting thursday. where prices have been cut, chopped, and sanded... on the most powerful tools that cut. ...chop... ...and sand. so we, or somebody on our list, can do the same. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. the early bird gets a special buy on a ryobi two-piece lithium-ion kit, just $99. >>> it's being called the thanksgiving creep. a record number of stores are getting a jump-start on the holiday shopping season by opening their doors tonight. nbc's kevin tibbles is live in chicago for us. he's getting ready to shop till he drops, always ready to do the deed for work. so, what you got there? how bad is it going to be out there today? >> alex, if you think i'm going to be in a mall today, you've got me confused with the other 83 million kevin tibbless who aren't in the phone book. but it is thanksgiving. happy thanksgiving to everyone. for those of you who do have that sort of deal bug, well,
a share so many in common -- an economy and larger value system. we share security needs and we share security threats. when you have a relationship that close, it cannot help but be good. it has been good. i look for to four more years of working with president obama. >> you just returned from asia. you seem dead like them in a little jet lag. >> president obama is in asia. his first trip when he was elected was here in ottawa. his first trip for his reelection was asia. you both you asia as important both of you are committed to enhancing free trade. you are looking at 50 trade deals. i wanted to ask you -- when our organization was founded 25 years ago, we were founded to be a proponent of free trade. there are not enough voices on either side of the border that point out the benefits. that is why we started it. my observation is that canadians are more open to free trade than americans. their message is of protectionism. what are your observations? what do you attribute the difference to? >> in negotiations on trade agreement -- we are and 50 to go she asians. one is with the euro
. >> it is doing it now with china and japan. you have to of the biggest economies in the world in a nightmare situation that raises the fundamental question and up in in this myth that economics draws people together. part of the title today is "mischief or miscalculation?" during the cold war, you could have 17 different spheres of contact with the soviets and it two blew up, you could still have 15 others. there was a lot of heavy investment in figuring out how to court made, communicate, due to escalation and talk if things got bad. in this era, when i look at the amount of time -- the obama administration more so than the bush administration, when officials meet throughout the region, and the discussion attempt to correlate with china, there seems to be a lot of effort to try to coordinate. jim steinberg was the fourth member of this panel, looking at the island dispute and said, they were shocked and surprised by the level of miscommunication, miss assessment, and the dangers of that between china and japan. it raises the question of whether or not -- i agree. i know china wants respect
. this is someone else on the investment committee said. is point was the transformation of the world economy lift poor people in china and india into the middle class and one american drops out of the middle class, that is not such a bad trade, 4-1. i spoke to a cfo of a u.s. technology company and this is a person with a charming and lovely life story, his parents were immigrants and he told me his parents told him and his brother when they immigrated that they were temporarily for. imagine that, temporarily poor and sure enough complete rock stars, both of them went to new york. and the mass club, one brother in silicon valley and another is derivative on wall street. the technology cfo, his parents were really angry at him because he dropped out of a ph.d. program in applied math at stanford having gone to harvard to start becoming plutocrats. very hard-working guy, did smart, did great, this is what he said about the american middle-class. we are demand higher paycheck than the rest of the world. if you are going to demand ten times the paycheck you need to deliver ten times the value. it sou
business, like the economy is doing well. he has known boehner for years and believes the speaker wants to make a deal with president obama to avoid the fiscal cliff and impact on families but also seen washington's disfunction and has his doubts. >> somewhat just like the president, time to go ahead and do your job. >> reporter: speaker boehner is secure enough in his own district here north of cincinnati i-75 that his constituents will give him a freehand to negotiate. his bigger challenge is pulling together republicans from districts across the country behind any deal he ultimately strikes with president obama. the next four weeks that is the challenge john boehner, eric canter, and candidates on the house and senate are going to find. how do you put together a deal that not only the leaders agree upon but members of the caucuses can give majority to us in both houses? >> indeed, john, thank you very much. >>> meantime, some important economic data came out today and if you were looking at it expecting to see signs of worry about that looming fiscal cliff, you might be surprised. st
on the top 2% of households and it's not going to hurt the economy one bit. >> oh, that part i won't -- >> it's got to be part of the deal. >> that's part of the deal. >> before you answer that, art, i want to say, a second issue. let's put it right on table since jared opened up. many people believe since the president's budget want $1.6 trillion -- $1.6 trillion, of revenues, over ten years. >> over the next ten years, to be clear. >> next ten years. he will wish to raise the top tax rates. that includes income taxes, cap gains, dividends and estate taxes. and art laffer, he will also wish to curb deductions so he will raise tax revenues as well as tax rates and art, that sets the stage for a stalemate politically. what does it do economically also? >> well, it does set the stage politically. by not doing anything, all the tax rates go up on everyone. that's for sure. so, the question is, the republicans will pass a bill that extends all the tax cuts. i mean, that they will go along with no problem. they won't go along with a double wammy and they shouldn't. this is obama's economy. this is
on skills, giving a big boost to their economies. it's not as if america doesn't need these people. american companies are struggling to fill 3.6 million job opening, many of them in science-related fields. meanwhile foreign students receive half of their doctorates in foreign fields and most all will head home after graduation. new york city mayor michael bloomberg calls it the single biggest problem facing the economy and argues that our current approach is national suicide. the good news is we may finally be on the road to a solution. immigration reform has been a taboo topic for the last few years as large and vocal voices within the republican party with considerable public support have blocked any mention of reform. the words they've wanted to hear are border fence and deportation. that's why mitt romney activated a policy of self-deportation during the prisonal campaign. that's why he lost the spanish vote and asian vote to president obama by a landslide. president obama seems emboldened and the republicans chasened. so we have an opening for a deal. what should it look like? >> well,
, and they're not interested in raising taxes, they think it is a bad idea for the economy. the only way to have a stimulus to the private sector is to leave more money in the private sector. the other thing that folks in kentucky don't understand is that why is it a fiscal cliff to cut spending? most people in our state think we're spending too much money up here and we should cut spending. in fact, the majority of congress voted for this sequester. why was it a good idea a year ago and now it is not a good idea. >> on spending and spending cuts, you may have something in common with the president, which i want to get to. you mentioned the people in your great state of kentucky and, look, we know and we're all hoping they're out and about shopping, it is holiday season, and in terms of the timing with this -- with this deal, you know, hopefully getting done before january 1, a lot of people want to avoid the tax increase that will automatically happen as people are paying those holiday bills, right? >> here's my question. if it is bad to raise taxes on everyone, why is it good to raise
this difficult time we have had with the economy. the richest of the rich will have to pay a little bit more to solve the financial problems we have in this country. [inaudible] >> right after the senate majority leader harry reid spoke, republican leaders held their own briefing and ways to find a deal and criticized leader reid's plan. this is 15 minutes. >> good afternoon, everyone. as we head into the fiscal cliff negotiations, my advice to the president would be -- seems like our friends on the other side are having difficulty turning off the campaign. we need to sit down and work this matter out. i think we have a clear sense and opportunity here at the end of the year to do something important for the country. we all know that the most critical steps to be taken are to save the entitlements, which are on an unsustainable path to bankruptcy. there's no better time to begin to fix that problem than right now. so i would hope our friends on the other side can kind of turn off the campaign and get into a cooperative mode here to reach a conclusion. which leads me to make a further observa
kiss our economy good-bye. because we will all be going over -- >> that fiscal cliff. >> fiscal cliff. >> fiscal cliff. >> that dreaded fiscal cliff. >> stephen: yes, the dreaded fiscal cliff. an unavoidable money will technology the razor-sharp financial rocks below. it all started back in 2011 during the showdown over raising our debt ceiling when republicans wanted spending cuts and obama wanted to raise taxes. which led to a budget crisis that congress solved by not solving it. (laughter) instead, they handed it over to something called "the supercongress" which couldn't fail because it was super. (laughter) unfortunately it was also congress so it failed. (laughter) and as a result -- (applause) as a result -- (applause) as a result, folks, we are facing another thing called sequestration which at first sounds like rationing the amount you can watch "sea quest." (laughter) but it's even worse than that. (laughter) sequestration is automatic spending cuts that both sides agree would trigger a new recession. it's like congress put a gun to the economy's head and swore it will pull
. but the transformation of the economy and meanwhile what america and drops out that is not a bad trade. i spoke to the cfo of but technology company as a person that was tied with these born and told me his parents told him that they were temporarily pour. imagine that. sure enough him and his brothers are both rock stars and avid members of the club now they find it. one does silicon valley the other does derivatives on wall street. his parents were angry because he dropped out of the ph.d. program of applied map after going to harvard. very smart and it did great and this is what he said. we demand a higher paycheck and the rest of the world. said you need to deliver 10 times the value. it sounds harsh but people in the middle class need to decide to take a pay cut. similarly was when i heard about the financial crisis. i expected wall street to feel guilty and realize you don't tell the truth to the reporter but they are off the record. almost invariably they did not blame themselves. this ceo told me sincerely he did not feel guilty for the crisis the culprit was his cousin who owns three c
. we're always looking at geopolitical risks. it does play a part in the global economy. with slow global growth domestically and overseas, the last thing we need is another geopolitical crisis. >> fiscal cliff taking a backseat today. how are you allocating capital today? >> we're very cautious now, frankly. we have about a two-week window. i think the markets are being a bit accommodating, frankly, until we get more clarity. >> rick santelli, did you see any movement in the markets when they announced the cease fire? it had very specific impacts here and there, but wasn't a widespread thing, was it? >> no, it really wasn't. as a i talk, you can look at ten-year for every major developed economy. the u.s., the germans, the french, the u.k., the japanese. month to date, the patterns are almost all die dent call. with all these variables, elections, mideast, fiscal cliff, it seems as though there's only so much flight to safety bid you can push into the marketplace. some traders say that's why you didn't notice. in the old days, it would make a difference. yields are already most ac
not believe that we have this strong economy that they did on a day where decent data came out last week. which is it? >> good question. the bottom line is we're in a trading range right now. this market has now for about the last six weeks between 85 and 89 dollars. you buy the dips, sell the rallies and work in between there. this market is not giving you any reason to break out of the range yet. we're waiting of course with news dollar wise, stock market wise, inventory wise, weather wise, anything that could really give you at least something to hang your hat on and at least make a serious line in the sand here, up or down right now. but right now there's just a market that's trading. the story of the day, though, liz, natural gas, which i don't know if you realize, it's down almost 5% today. liz: i saw that. and i thought -- i just thought well maybe it's just because we're not really seeing as much snow as we expected here on the east coast tomorrow. >> quite accurate. in fact there was an updated weather report i believe from the national weather service that just predicts a littl
class. "we need to make the investments that will help the economy grow for years into the future. although that is achievable. with a little give, we can get it done. >> with new say a deal is best achieved by the end of the year, does that rule out the president agreeing to kicking it over into next year? i was asked if he supports the it -- what did you call them? the fiscal cliff divers? it is our belief in president's belief as being spelled out in the plant today, it would rain damage being done to the economy if we do not extend tax cuts for the middle-class and address the other elements of the fiscal cliff and, more broadly speaking, address our long term fiscal challenges and how the economy creates jobs. we need to get this done and that is what we're working on. >> one more? >> olivier, alexis, april. >> you have said repeatedly "we" have expressed concerns? >> i would refer to the state department. >> were you for warrant that mr. mursi was going to do this? -- were you forewarned mr. morsi was going to do this? >> these are separate issues. we have raised our concern
us a lot about the state of the consumer and the u.s. economy today. so we're turning to one of the most seasoned and respected voices on wall street for help. we have dana telsey. she is our guest host for the next three hours. andrew, i'll send it over to you. >> we begin with a visit to toyland and here is toys r us. it opened its doors at 8:00 last night. and we have toys r us ceo joining us right now from the company's flagship store in times square. good morning. >> good morning. >> so i read a report you you had a big line. what's it been like all evening? >> it's been great. we did have a big line. we're at 44th and broadway.line went all the the way to 45th street and then down 45th all the way to 6th avenue. it was huge. people came in in a real celebratory mood. people ate ice cream, relaxed with their kids. i've never seen a black friday like this before, but 8:00 hour worked really well for families. >> let's talk about sales. how did it go overnight? >> we're just starting. this is 5:00 a.m. on black friday morning. we're really just starting. we have about a b.
for that the economy is finally on the mend? we're going to ask a guy who just might be the best investor ever to walk this earth. how is that for an introduction. >> pretty good. >> warren buffett, glad to have you here. >> all right. an important health warning. if you've having a grapefruit or grapefruit juice for breakfast this morning, it can have serious, even fatal side effects, if you're using certain medications. dr. nancy snyderman will be here to explain that. >> a lot of medications take. like mother, like daughter. anna nicole smith's little girl is modeling for the clothing brand guess just like her mother did. we'll have more on that story. >>> we're also going to tell you about a recent health scare for oprah winfrey. >> we want to begin with cyber monday, big success. diana alvear is live from phoenix at the amazon.com fulfillment center. good morning to you. >> reporter: lots of happy faces on the floor this morning. now that it's clear the consumers were out in full force, shopping with their laptops, their devices, turning amaz amazon.com into their top online destination. whether
that the wealthy are job creators and they may not be able to stimulate the economy as much as a mite -- as they might. >> absolutely, that is their argument and one buffett argued that this is a great opportunity -- and warren buffett argued that if there is a great opportunity, people will not turn it down because the tax rate is not lower. what we have seen in the last two or three decades is the middle class income is stagnating, even as the very top has grown. trickle-down is not working. ameriprise to think of something else. >> thank you -- america house to think of something else. >> thank you for joining me. several people were killed when a fire broke out al-zawahiri workshop for disabled people. more than 100 firefighters were called -- broke out when a workshop for disabled people caught on fire. more than 100 firefighters were called to the scene. >> it happened in a small town in southwest germany. it was a workshop for physically disabled people at a project run by the catholic charity caritas. some people were trapped and contents were made by firefighters in breathing
did a wonderful job to keep the economy on track, hasn't it? >> greg: opposed to socialnism >> bob: opposed to misguided management. >> dana: even when the employees vote to not be in the union the union does this on their behalf. that is what we're supposed to believe. unions are feeling their oath. if romney would have won, they would have done it as well. the unions are declining so much with people part of them they trying to do what they can. they risk losing in court of public opinion. earlier today, they sat in sixth avenue to proest he had to come to work today. everyone was yelling at him and saying ridiculous. get up and get to work. >> greg: union of one. >> bob: you make a good point. the union membership declined dramatically. i don't know what you are worried about. you a right for a union and collectively bargain. >> greg: we have a right to travel. >> dana: you talk about prime minister benjamin netanyahu would risk going too far and losing support in the international court of public opinion. do you not agree that the union is doing this and to greg's point now eve
office the cbo and outside observers, fiscal shock of that size would sent the economy toppling back into recession. >> and it wouldn't keep saying the deal's going to get done. if not, there are real repercussions, steve. >> absolutely. but, alex, what we're looking at now, as we head into next week, the general framework for the talk for the next four weeks is kind of a two-track system. one is let's do some agreement to avoid the fiscal cliff and that may be another short-term agreement to extend the rates, extend the spending as is, or maybe a slight modification and we'll have a negotiation next year on part two the grand bargain to overhaul the tax code and spending. i think both sides go into this with the general agreement, the leaders, that is, that they're going to have a short-term solution. i think the stock market's going to take a bit of a hit in the three or four weeks until we get to that end game but i think they're moving toward that. >> david, you agree with that? we're going to get something whether permanent or a downpayment. >> i think so. neither side wants a r
have on the economy and consumer spending. increased taxes could cut consumer spending spite $200 billion. -- consumer spending by $200 billion. what it can take all negotiations over the sequestered, we are focusing and the beginnings of the debate on the national debt in prime time. we will go back to august of last year to review some of the debate and news conferences from congress and the white house surrounding the passage of the budget control act. the law created automatic spending cuts set to take effect in january along with expiring tax provisions, part of the so- called fiscal cliff. that is tonight at 8:00 eastern on c-span. congress returns from a week long thanksgiving break this week. the house is back tomorrow to debate a number of bills. a major bill comes up on thursday when they will consider a visa program for students getting advanced degrees and computer science, engineering and mathematics. off the floor, democrats plan to let new leadership. that is scheduled for thursday. you can see the house tomorrow on c-span. the senate is back today at 2:00 eastern.
, it looks like. thanks so much. >>> so, was the holiday weekend, the boost that the u.s. economy needed. abc's bianna golodryga is here. >>> good morning, it's not just the thrill of finding a great deal. take a look at this. consumer spending makes up 70% of the u.s. economy and 40% of that will happen in just these two months, november and december. so how did we fare over the past two days? not too shabby. $59 million spent. the average american in the past four days spent some $423. interesting to note, though, that black friday sales were actually down nearly 28% this year compared to last year. why? well, i guess a lot of people excused themselves thursday night from thanksgiving dinner, went out to the stores shopping. overall, we're expected to see a 4.1% increase from last year. that is very good news for the u.s. economy. of course, thanksgiving came early this year. we'll see if americans continue the spreading spree up to christmas. amy? >> it's all about having more days to shop. bianna golodryga, thank you so much. >>> let's head to josh elliott with the other top stories devel
. >> that is what is interesting. you have two of the biggest economies in the world in a nightmarish situation that raises the fundamental question. that draws people closer together. part of the title today is mischief and miscalculation. what was really interesting if you could have 17 different spheres of contact with the soviet end of two of them well, you could still have 15 others. there is a lot of heavy investment and how to talk about things like that and in this era, when i look at the amount of time, particularly in the obama administration, if you look at senior officials go to asia throughout the region and they have meetings or others and also the discussion that tends to coordinate with china, there seems to be a lot of efforts try to coordinate. looking out the value of the in the dispute and said that they were shocked and surprised by the level of miscommunication and assessment and the dangers of that between china and japan. so raises the question of whether or not -- i agree with you. i know china wants respect. but whether or not what you are seeing is a strategic or taxa
about the economy. he was shopping in a book store. here's the video. the president buying the books. we'll go over and show books you are getting. and okay, get out -- five minutes. and look at that. >> >> steve: funny. not true. fiscal cliff. what is the fiscal cliff. what that means right now all of the taxings for the most part are scheduled to go up and spending cuts are sposed to go in place and if that is not enough. democrats are insisting that alongg with the fiscal cliff there should be an agreement on raising the debt limit. >> brian: billionns or trillions. going to hit the ceiling. you want to know how it relate to you. it is 2000 per family and everyone making a certain amount of money. we could be heading to this. and it is not to anyone's ben benefit to go over the cliff. there is a push to how to get manage done. president of the united states is going on the campaign traill through a series of rallies. >> steve: to a tinker toy factory. >> brian: get yourself up to lincoln log jacks on the way home. >> gretchen: this is disconcerting once again. instid of members that w
, getting reform on wall street that doesn't -- that works. doesn't make our economy vulnerable to the gambles of people in our society. finding a way to address the fundamental debt crisis that will burden our children and our children's children and our children's children's children. if you don't fundamentally change the way these elections are financed, you're going to keep getting candidates who are in favor of their funders. of course! >> cenk: there was just a poll done where 67% of americans said politicians need to do something about climate change. they need to take legislative action. only 25% said no. don't do anything. 67% to 25%. if we had a functioning democracy, there would be immediate action on that. but in reality there is not a peep. so i've been covering politics for about 17 years now. the reason that i'm passionate about campaign finance reform is it is the rosetta stone of politics. if you want to know who's going to win on any given issue it always comes back to the same thing. follow
the imagination of the individual entepreneur. we had economies that went back many, many miennia and were successful until 1492. john: indians had a form of property rights before white settlers came here and mess that up. some indians actually owned the salmon streams. they manage those streams so that they let the larger salmon go up to spawn. the result is that even today those streams have larger salmon and the streams that were held in common owned by everyone and hence managed by no one. john: not an individual indian, but a plan would on the stream. why today would they still have more salmon? >> that just goes back to what was superior management over a century ag. and at the same time i should know we are mismanaging our salmon stocks by chasing them around the ocean, open ocean and over harvesting salmon and many other species. we could learn from what the native americans did. john: you say you can see the private property difference by driving through some indian land >> it is fascinating to drive through the reservation in the west. recently i drove through the crow indian re
a careful look at contemporary theory of political economy. you are going to have to bear with me for 10 minutes or so and i promise we will get back to soldiers but we can appreciate the real significance of this rhetoric of romantic patriotism in less wafers get a good grasp on the serious scientific thinking that lay behind it. informal theory, freedom to love, marry and reproduce, became essential elements of both american liberty and american power. now americans in the era of 1812 were themselves actually very well-versed in population theory. regular methodical government accounts for all the inhabitants meant that even average people had access to basic facts that they nation's population strengths. from the time of the first national census in 1792 the second which was in 1800, the nation's numbers expanded them approximately 3.9 million, to about 5.3 million they continued rising sharply, reaching 7.2 million by the third official census in 1810. so in total, the nation's numbers increased nearly twofold in just two decades. these official figures were reported widely in region
's a wonderful point. longer term you are looking at the united states economy doing better than not bad. it will grind along. we're not calling it for a double dip recession in 2013. we think fiscal cliff will be resolved in large part. creating opportunity if you have done your homework and you have long-term discipline, use vo volatility to your advantage. great cash position. europe has good companies. china will stimulate. not like in 2009 but it will be there. i think the death of equities and u.s. market is greatly exaggerated. you do have to do your homework because short-term volatility will give you opportunities and challenges. >> after what we hear this weekend, does it make sense to focus on discretionary going into year end? >> it does. it has coming into the third and fourth quarter. again, pick your battles. understand what you're getting into. name specific analysis is critical. build that portfolio. look globally. it's more than just a u.s. story. looking into europe, emerging markets if you have a longer term time horizon. commodities. all of these things are going to
decade. it's not only going to change the face of american demographics and the u.s. economy, it's going to change our economic standing across the globe. it resets everything. resets everything. >> and all starts tremendous consequences, u.s. reliance and dependence on the middle east obviously changes when we become a larger oil producer than saudi arabia. >> and maybe we can stop fighting wars in the middle east. >> maybe. >> we can go to north dakota instead. i'm telling you, those canadians, i don't trust they will. i do not trust them! >> hey, we need to figure out, what's the line that separates, you know -- >> we need a parallel. >> we need a parallel. a canadian parallel. the canadians and i've been talking about this for years -- >> i'm going to take a poll. may i take the cane and beat joe on the head with it? >> seriously, how many divisions -- >> all those who agree, raise their hands. >> a lot of canadians watch "morning joe." we don't want to hurt you, we want your oil. it would be good, right? is this what the dream of nafta was all those years ago? >> nafta is one of the
, the end of the blockade, or the easing of the blockade, that's crippled the economy now for four years, and the israelis want security, obviously, for because of the hamas rockets hit for the first time as far as tel aviv and jerusalem. so there's motive to move forward. the question is, is there the will. that's always been the issue. >> both sides have the motive to move forward, as you say. both sides also claiming victory in this small skirmish over the last several days. want to play a sound bite from the leader of hamas who spoke in gaza city. >> translator: the victory of gaza is a solid truth, not a phenomenon. the era of egypt and the region has changed, and america has now beginning to learn a new and listen to a new language. >> so is he right? is there a new era dawning in the middle east? and what does it mean for the u.s.? >> well, there's clearly a new era dawning in the middle east. and we're still trying to figure out what the new order is going to look like, as are many people on the ground. but both sides to a certain degree can claim a degree of victory here. hamas
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